It’s been a while…

I don’t know what it’s like for other people who write similar blogs to me, but I constantly think of things to upload on here and I just never get around to doing it.

Life has been busy for me over the last couple of months. In my role, as Operations Assistant, the end of year amps up, rather than slows down. We have our staff retreat, Christmas related events/activities and then long days of Payroll.

That doesn’t mean to say there haven’t been things I’ve wanted to share on here. For example, I went away with my mother for a week a couple of months ago and I have some beauty pics to share (like below) and I went on the previously mentioned staff retreat just recently.

I’ve also had a rheumatologist appointment and it was disappointing to say the least. I felt like I didn’t get any answers, the computer was broken so the rheumatologist who was seeing me (not my normal lady) couldn’t see my history, and the ultrasound machine was broken, so we were unable to check the inflammation in my joints properly. I felt like the lady was misunderstanding the small amount of medical history she was able to access and was not listening to me, and she couldn’t give me any advice about the side effects of the rheumatoid arthritis medication I’m on. It honestly felt pointless, and therefore disappointing. Aside from that, though, I’m doing pretty well in regards to my arthritis. I still have days were specific joints hurt more than others and I’m generally still tired a lot faster than I used to be, but overall I’m doing well.

I feel lucky to know what kind of condition I have (although they can’t 100% confirm) and I’m taking medication that seems to be working and I have a workplace that is really flexible with my hours when I have appointments to attend.

Anyway, I thought I’d pop by to say hello while I had the chance, and I look forward to my free summer days where I can share more on here.

P.S. my doggo passed away a year ago and I miss her dearly. It was a horrific evening, the night she passed, but it doesn’t reflect the absolutely wonderful life she had and the joy she brought to our family. Love you forever, Brown.

Self-care on the Road to Recovery

How self-care affects recovery

Over the past 8 months, I have come to realise that self-care is a dominant player in my Rheumatoid Arthritis recovery. I am a true believer that recovery is holistic and that overall well-being is important, not just physical improvement. During a conversation I was having with my physio about ‘pacing’ activities (I’m focusing on walking at the moment – read more about ‘pacing’ here) I realised that not only has my ‘pacing’ been helping my recovery physically but so has spending time in nature! I love a good flower find and enjoy breathing in fresh air.

Taking care of ourselves

We have to take care of ourselves before we can take care of others – that can be in the context of a parent-child relationship, friend-friend relationship, with your partner or even with a stranger. This concept has been explained to me in relation to flying in an aeroplane – we have to put our oxygen mask on before we can put the mask on a child/any else that needs help. This is pointing out that if we are struggling, it becomes a lot harder for us to help other people.

So, what can we do about it? 

I truly believe that self-care is a crucial part of everyone’s health and well-being, but especially those who are recovering from something, like myself. This is when active self-care comes into play. It’s about making sure we take time out to care for ourselves. There are basic self-care aspects, such as ensuring you are feed balanced, nutritious food and have the appropriate amount of time to sleep, but there is also a deeper level of self-care that we need to take into account. We all have physical, emotional/mental and spiritual needs that we have to consider when thinking about self-care. Self-care changes from person to person, as well. It’s all about listening to your body and being aware of what you need.

How do you know what works well for you? In my experience, it’s all about trial and error. You give something a go and see whether it works for you. For example, sometimes self-care is all about spending time alone and sometimes its all about spending time with others.

Where do I start? 

Below is a list of self-care habits I personally like, which you are encouraged to try out:

  • taking a bath
  • quality time reading a book
  • eating some of my favorite food
  • ‘earthing’ – physically connecting with the earth e.g. walking on the beach barefoot or lying on the grass looking up to the sky (although my hay fever is not a fan of that one)
  • going for a walk either by myself or with friends
  • having a nice nap
  • listening to some music that makes me feel good
  • spending time trying out some new recipes
  • spending some time with my best friend
  • lighting a candle at my meal time and sitting down at the table to eat
  • watching my favorite TV show
  • asking to catch up with a friend I haven’t seen in a while
  • buying something that I usually wouldn’t buy
  • going to the movies
  • doing a face mask
  • thoroughly cleaning my teeth

Self-care can be part of your normal daily routine and it can also be a special time that you have allocated. There are some habits I tend to perform more than others, as I have learnt over the years what I need to on a regular basis and what I need when I’m feeling a certain way.

Can you recognise what self-care habits that you do on a regular basis? If you have any self-care tips, let me know!

A Slow and Steady Journey: Arthritis Update

I’ve been a bit MIA on my blog lately, as life has just been jam-packed full of activities and appointments. Now that I have a bit of time up my sleeve, I thought I’d give an update on my arthritis. For those that haven’t read my previous blogs, I have Seronegative Rheumatoid Arthritis, which developed after I got Reactive Arthritis as a result of getting salmonella. This was back in December 2017 and things still aren’t back to normal, but they are improving – here’s how:

  1. I had a terrible sleep on Saturday night, so much so that I actually only slept for about an hour over the whole course of the night, for no particular reason that I could tell. It was a humble reminder that only a short 7 months ago, I was having to get up every two hours in order to take pain medication to get through the night (and day) without being in excruciating pain. In terms of pain, I have come a long way.
  2. A couple of weeks ago, I had a rheumatology appointment at the hospital to see how I was going. There is still a small portion of active inflammation in my joints (those affected for me are; both ankles, both knees, both elbows and both shoulders), but overall, it has significantly gone down since my first visit with my rheumatologist. In terms of active inflammation, I have come a long way. 
  3. I started driving about 2 or so months ago. That means I had about 6 months without driving and without having any independence. That was hard for me. I still get a sore leg after driving, and the parking isn’t great where I work, so my mum still has to drive me to work and back every day, but I’m driving outside of that, for social events and errands. In terms of driving, I have come a long way.
  4. This week, I had my first physio appointment. I had asked to see a physio as I am still having trouble walking properly, as well as getting the sore leg after driving. It was a great session and he said I haven’t done any damage, but just need to improve my strength – something I already suspected but appreciated hearing. I think back to when this first happened and I couldn’t walk at all on my right leg (where I first got the inflammation). I was then on crutches for about 5 months and have since been using a walking stick. I still have the walking stick, to help when I’m having to stand in the same spot for ages or when I need to walk long distances or generally need some support. In terms of walking, I have come a long way.

I still have a long way to go; I can’t ‘go for a walk’ yet, I’m still using a walking stick, I struggle to stand in the same spot for too long (e.g. showering and cooking), we’re still trying to figure out what treatment will work best for me, I’m still coming off the steroids, I still need to try and lose the weight the steroids caused me to gain, I still get sore if I push my self too hard…. but, I’ve come a long way.

The rheumatologist has said that it’s more than likely that I will be living with this arthritis my entire life, but as long as I take the medication/once we’ve found the right balance, I should be able to live a ‘normal life’.

The physio has tasked me to try ‘pacing’, i.e. with walking, spend a few days trying to figure out how many minutes I can walk at once (I’m doing after work), without pushing myself enough that I need a rest. I then need to calculate the few days together and figure out the average – I’m thinking it will be about 10 minutes. Once I’ve done that, I need walk for that amount of time every day for a week. If everything is going well, add another 10% on for the following week and so on. This concept is based on trying to stop or discourage a cycle of overdoing it and then needing rest, then overdoing it again once you feel better and round and round it goes. What we want, is to build up my strength slowly so I can function on a day to day basis without needing to take a day of rest in between. I also have a few exercises to do, one I can do at my desk at work and the other I need to do at home with an exercise band (pictured).

It is a slow and steady journey, but I am getting there!